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21. Learning From Fables

21. Learning From Fables

“One day a countryman going to the nest of his Goose found there an egg all yellow and glittering. When he took it up it was as heavy as lead and he was going to throw it away, because he thought a trick had been played upon him. But he took it home on second thoughts, and soon found to his delight that it was an egg of pure gold. Every morning the same thing occurred, and he soon became rich by selling his eggs. As he grew rich he grew greedy; and thinking to get at once all the gold the Goose could give, he killed it and opened it only to find nothing.” -The Goose With The Golden Eggs

You might remember hearing one version or another of this story when you were younger. It’s a Fable, written by Aesop, a contemporary of Croesus and Peisistraus who is said to have lived in the mid-century BC in Greece. His life is shrouded in mystery (which you can read all about it here) but his stories pretty much follow the same formula. Like all Fables to follow they are short, concise stories that anthropomorphize plants, animals or inanimate objects in order to teach a moral lesson.

What’s most interesting about these stories is how long lived they’ve been. There is something about breathing life into the inanimate that lends itself to memory. If the Goose had been a banker, the story would have died a long time ago.

When creating stories, consider the effect that strong symbols can have on your audience. I mean, if Geico gets it, you should too.

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